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Citrus Research Board Announces 2018 Citrus Grower Seminar Series

The Citrus Research Board (CRB) is proud to announce the return of the Citrus Grower Seminar Series, co-produced by the University of California Cooperative Extension (UCCE). Three different meeting dates and locations will give growers from different regions the opportunity to attend.

The FREE half-day seminars start at 8:30 AM and are expected to end at 12:00 PM. Registration will begin at 7:30 AM.

CLICK HERE to view event flyer (including guest speakers).

 

Continuing Education Units Available:
Continuing Education (CE) Units have been approved by the California
Department of Pesticide Regulation for license categories PCA, QAL, QAC and Private Applicators. 

Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) Units have also been applied for and are pending approval.

Southern California – Desert: 2.5 “other” and 0.5 “laws and regulations” approved
Central Coast: 3.0 “other” and 0.5 “laws and regulations” approved
Central Valley: 3.0 “other” and 0.5 “laws and regulations” approved

Release of National Citrus Breeders Collaboration Meeting Final Report

Sixty‐two citrus rootstock and scion breeders, university administrators, citrus industry representatives, federal government officials and citrus research funding agency representatives met in Denver, Colorado to discuss barriers and find solutions to achieve more effective coordination and collaboration among citrus breeder scientists working on huanglongbing (HLB) mitigation. Participants identified four major areas of barriers based on the whole group’s discussion of the pre‐workshop survey: 1) Scientific Barriers, 2) Regulatory Barriers, 3) Intellectual Property and Tech Transfer Barriers and 4) Funder‐related Barriers. This final report outlines their findings and next steps to achieve more effective coordination and collaboration among citrus breeder scientists working on HLB mitigation.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE FULL REPORT

California Citrus Economic Impact Final Report – Citrus Research Board Quantifies Industry Importance

NEW STUDY REVEALS CALIFORNIA CITRUS ECONOMIC IMPACT

Citrus Research Board Quantifies Industry Importance

                                       

May 16, 2018 – Visalia, Calif. – The total economic impact of California’s iconic citrus industry is $7.117 billion according to a new study commissioned by the Citrus Research Board (CRB).

            “In updating our economic analysis, we selected a well-known expert, Bruce Babcock, Ph.D., a professor in the School of Public Policy at the University of California, Riverside, to conduct the research. His findings quantified the significant impact of citrus on California’s economic well-being,” said CRB President Gary Schulz.

            According to Babcock, the California citrus industry added $1.695 billion to the state’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in 2016. “California citrus is a major contributor to the economic value of the state’s agricultural sector and is much larger than just the value of its sales,” he said. “Estimated full-time equivalent California citrus jobs totaled 21,674 in 2016-17, and estimated wages paid by the industry during that same timeframe totaled $452 million.”

            Babcock added, “The application of management skills and capital equipment to efficiently utilize land and water to produce high-quality citrus also generates upstream and downstream jobs and income that magnify the importance of citrus production beyond its farm value.”

            In 2016-17, the most recent marketing year of data compilation, Babcock found that the total direct value of California citrus production was $3.389 billion. This value generated an additional $1.263 billion in economic activity from related businesses that supplied materials and services to the citrus industry. Layered on top was another $2.464 billion in economic activity generated by household spending income that they received from California’s industry, according to Babcock, thus rendering a total economic impact of $7.117 billion.

            The study revealed that 79 percent of California’s citrus was packed for the fresh market and 21 percent was processed in 2016-17, which is economically significant because fresh market fruit has a higher value than processed fruit.”

            Of further note, California produced about 95 percent of all U.S. mandarins in the most recent reporting season.

California Citrus Mutual President Joel Nelsen commented, “The “wow” factor in this report is something as it relates to gross revenues and positive impact for the state, people and local communities.  This enthusiasm must be tempered by the fact that huanglongbing (HLB) can destroy all this in a matter of a year if the partnerships that exist between the industry and government cannot thwart the spread of this insidious disease.  Just this week, coincidentally, Brazil authorities reported a 20% reduction in fruit volume.  Reading how that would affect our family farmers, employees and the state is sobering.”

            The CRB study also looked at the possible impact of a potential 20 percent reduction in California citrus acreage or yield or a combination of the two that could result from increased costs associated with meeting government regulations, combatting the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) and warding off the invasion of HLB, a devastating disease that has decimated citrus production in many other growing regions such as Florida. Babcock calculated that such a reduction could cause a loss of 7,350 jobs and $127 million in associated employment income and could reduce California’s GDP by $501 million in direct, indirect and induced impacts. The CRB currently is devoting most of its resources to battling ACP and HLB to help ensure the sustainability of California citrus.

            Babcock is a Fellow of the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association and has won numerous awards for his applied policy research. The economist received his Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of California, Berkeley and his Masters and Bachelors degrees from the University of California, Davis.

            The CRB administers the California Citrus Research Program, the grower-funded and grower-directed program established in 1968 under the California Marketing Act as the mechanism enabling the State’s citrus producers to sponsor and support needed research. More information about the Citrus Research Board and the full report on the “Economic Impact of California’s Citrus Industry” may be found at www.citrusresearch.org.

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CLICK HERE TO VIEW FULL PRESS RELEASE

CLICK HERE TO VIEW FULL REPORT

 

Request for Proposal (RFP) – Financial Auditing Services

Citrus Research Board Request For Proposal

Financial Audit Request For Proposal
You are invited to review and respond to this Request For Proposal (RFP), entitled:
RFP – Audit Services

The deadline for this proposal is Friday, June 15, 2018 See the full request here

Joint ACP Biological Control Task Force Receives Prestigious CDPR IPM Achievement Award

 

     The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR), honored four organizations for their achievements in reducing risk from pesticide use in a public ceremony on February 12, 2018.

     “The variety of award winners this year demonstrates that pests—both in agricultural and urban settings—can be managed successfully using effective, low-risk methods,” said DPR Director Brian Leahy. “Integrated pest management is fundamental for managing pests thoughtfully and effectively in California.”

     The IPM Achievement Awards recognize organizations that use integrated pest management (IPM) to address the diverse pest management needs throughout California. IPM is a tool that allows people to manage pests by using natural and preventative strategies, and thus reduces the use of chemical pesticides. The awards will be given in the areas of innovation, leadership, and education and outreach.

     The Citrus Research Board Joint Agency Biological Control Task Force was one of the four honorees.

     In 2010, the Citrus Research Board (CRB) established a task force to help control an invasive insect pest called Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), a serious threat to the $3 billion California citrus industry. ACPs, which are as small as a grain of rice, can infect backyard citrus trees (and potentially commercial orchards) with a bacteria that causes a devastating plant disease called Huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening disease. There is no cure for HLB and it is fatal to trees. The CRB Joint Agency Biological Control Task Force was created and is comprised of the Citrus Research Board, California Department of Food & Agriculture, University of California-Riverside, the United States Department of Agriculture and Cal Poly-Pomona.

     Instead of relying solely on conventional pesticides to fight this insect, the task force developed a program using natural predators as a means of reducing ACP populations. The Task Force imported, reared and studied parasitic wasps from Pakistan that kill ACPs. These wasps are a key part of the first biocontrol program that successfully targeted and reduced ACP populations in urban areas and citrus orchards while replacing large-scale, pesticide-driven campaigns in sensitive urban sites. At this time, the project has been successfully implemented in several counties, including Imperial, San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, and Santa Barbara counties. The Task Force was honored for innovation and leadership.

The Citrus Research Board would like to congratulate the other three honorees; Hines Landscaping San Francisco, Manteca Unified School District Operations Department and Orange County Mosquito and Vector Control District and thank CDPR for this honor.

     

 

CRB HLB External Scientific Review – Final Report

The Citrus Research Board (CRB) has released the final report of the HLB External Review, conducted at University of California, Davis on August 14-18, 2017. This report is for use in making future research funding decisions, closing research gaps, encouraging closer collaboration and other purposes as identified in the report.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW FULL REPORT

Citrus Research Board Hires New Lab Director

The Citrus Research Board (CRB) has announced the recent hiring of Qijun Xiang, Ph.D., as director of the Jerry Dimitman Laboratory in Riverside, California. 

As lab director, Xiang will work to re-establish a US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)-certified high throughput diagnostic laboratory designation for HLB detection with initial emphasis placed on ACP samples. He will report directly to CRB President Gary Schulz and will supervise laboratory staff responsible for preparing and analyzing insect and plant samples. Xiang’s group will work with CRB staff and other agencies such as the California Department of Food and Agriculture/Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Program, USDA-APHIS, USDA Agricultural Research Service and county pest control districts on regional diagnostic programs.

CLICK HERE TO READ FULL PRESS RELEASE

CRB Researcher Michelle Cilia Honored with Presidential Early Career Award

Michelle Cilia, Ph.D., California Citrus Research Board (CRB) researcher and research molecular biologist for the United States Department of Agriculture – Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) at the Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture & Health on the Cornell University campus in Ithaca, New York, has been named a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).
 
 CLICK HERE TO READ FULL PRESS RELEASE


 
Photo Caption: Michelle Cilia, Ph.D., working in her lab with graduate student, Annie Kruse. Annie is a Ph.D. candidate at Cornell University working on citrus greening research in the Cilia Lab.

CRB Launches E-Newsletter Campaign!

The Citrus Research Board (CRB) has launched it’s first edition of their monthly E-Newsletter for December 2016. The E-Newsletter hopes to bring you up-to-date news from the CRB and industry partners. Click on the link below to view the first edition and make sure to subscribe so that the January edition goes directly to your inbox.

Please click HERE for the 2016 December E-Newsletter