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Variety Development

2008 Wright and Kahn (Evaluation of Desert Lemons)

Evaluation of Lemon Selections for the Desert

For more than a century, California citrus has been a leader in the worldwide fresh fruit industry. One important component of the industry is the lemon. While many California lemons originate in coastal areas, or in the San Joaquin Valley, the first lemons of any new season, which begins in late August, come from the desert. However, the industry competes against other areas, such as Chile,Mexico and Spain, andmust maintain and increase market share by having a year-round volume of good quality fruit.

2008 Tracy L Kahn (Variety Evaluation for Trueness)

Citrus Variety Evaluation for Trueness-to-Type and Commercial Potential

California leads the nation in the production of fresh citrus for the domestic and export market. The increasing demand for seedless easy-to-peel mandarins and attractive citrus varieties once only available from countries where traditionally consumed is fueling changes in the global fresh citrus market. Importation of new citrus varieties from other parts of the world by the Citrus Clonal Protection Program and the development of new varieties by the UCR Citrus Breeding Program provides California citrus growers with a diversity of citrus available for production.

2008 Michael L Roose (Rootstock Breeding & Evaluation)

Citrus Rootstock Breeding and Evaluation

Citrus rootstocks are the foundation of any citrus grove, and choosing a rootstock is typically a decision that affects performance and profitability for the life of the grove. The objective of this project is to provide the California citrus industry with a wider diversity of rootstocks and with information that allows the optimal rootstock to be chosen for a given site. The current range of rootstocks does not include good options for specific conditions, such as calcareous soil types, long-term compatibility with mandarins and lemons, strong resistance to all citrus nematode biotypes, and tolerance or resistance to new threats such as Diaprepes root weevil.

2008 Michael L Roose (New Citrus Breeding)

Breeding of New Citrus Scion Varieties

Citrus scion breeding produces new potential varieties by hybridization or induction of mutations and then evaluates them at several locations in California. This process is slow because it requires at least two cycles of tree propagation and evaluation. The UCR breeding program, funded by the CRB since 1994, now has a “pipeline” filled with many new selections at various stages of evaluation.

2007 Tracy L Kahn (Variety Evaluation for Trueness)

Citrus Variety Evaluation for Trueness-to-Type and Commercial Potential

Preliminary evaluations of new citrus varieties for commercial potential and adaptability to California growing conditions benefits the California citrus industry by providing primary data to assist growers in choosing appropriate varieties for the domestic and export markets. Late and early season navel orange selections evaluated during past seasons have extended the navel orange marketing window, and new seedless mandarin varieties such as Tango will expand the fresh citrus market for California.

2007 Michael L Roose (Rootstock Breeding and Evaluation)

Citrus Rootstock Breeding and Evaluation

The objective of the citrus rootstock breeding project is to provide the California citrus industry with a wider diversity of rootstocks that improve productivity and profitability. The current range of rootstocks does not provide good choices for specific conditions, such as calcareous soil types, long-term compatibility with mandarins and lemons, strong resistance to all citrus nematode biotypes and tolerance or resistance to new threats such as Diaprepes root weevil.

2007 Mikeal L Roose (New Citrus Breeding)

Breeding of New Citrus Scion Varieties

Citrus scion breeding is a long-term project because the process of producing new potential varieties and then evaluating them at several locations in California requires at least two cycles of tree propagation and evaluation. However, the UCR breeding program, which has been funded by the CRB since 1994, is now in a relatively mature phase where the “pipeline” is filled with many new selections at various stages of evaluation.

2007 Glenn C Wright (Evaluation of Desert Lemons)

Evaluation of Lemon Selections for the Desert

By acreage, lemons are the second-most important citrus crop grown in California after navel oranges. Lemons are grown in the coastal regions, in the San Joaquin Valley, and in the desert. Each of these regions has a distinct climate that affects tree growth, fruit maturation time and fruit quality.