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Plant Management – Page 3

Production Trial of Newly Introduced Citrus Cultivars in California

Production Trial of Newly
Introduced Citrus Cultivars in California

The overall objective of this project was to establish a long-term production evaluation system for all newly introduced citrus cultivars in California.

Using Regulated Deficit Irrigation to Optimize Fruit Size in Late Harvest Navels

Using Regulated Deficit Irrigation to Optimize Fruit Size in Late Harvest Navels

Rather than only report 2006 results, this paper summarizes our four-year experiment on regulated deficit irrigation (RDI) with late harvest (Lane Late) citrus. Grower profits with late harvest navels can be significantly reduced due to both exces-sively large fruit and granulation. We evaluated four RDI regimes in addition to a fully irrigated Control in a commer-cial orchard in eastern Tulare Co. Three of the RDI treatments (T1, T2, and T3) imposed stress in the early (delay irrigation; mid May start), middle (Jul. thru Sept.), and late (mid Aug. thru Nov.) periods of the season, respectively, and a fourth (T4) imposed stress continuously throughout the season. Irrigation was at 50% of evapotranspiration (ETc) during the stress periods.

Scion/Rootstock Incompatibility as the Cause of Tree Decline in Fukumoto Navel

Scion/Rootstock Incompatibility as the Cause of Tree Decline in Fukumoto Navel

Fukumoto navel is an early-maturing navel with highly marketable fruit characteristics. While the fruit is in demand, many growers have had problems with tree decline. Graft union incompatibility appears to be the major reason for decline, but why some orchards are severely affected by decline and others suffer little damage remains a question.

Irrigation Stress and Early-Navel Fruit Maturity

Irrigation Stress and Early-Navel Fruit Maturity

The objective of this experiment was to measure the affects of water stress on yield and fruit quality factors, such as fruit size, color, juiciness, and sweetness, of early-maturing Beck navel in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California.

Petroleum Oils as Navel Orange and Tangelo Fruit Thinning Agents

Petroleum Oils as Navel Orange and Tangelo Fruit Thinning Agents

Citrus trees frequently set more fruit than can attain profitable size. Small fruit often do not return the cost of picking, trans-porting and packing. The desired outcome of fruit thinning in the current marketplace is a reduction in fruit numbers with a concomitant increase in fruit size without a decrease in yield by weight. Growers do not have an inexpensive and reliable method of thinning citrus.