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Entomology – Page 4

2007 Godfrey and Morse (Diaprepes Phenology)

Diaprepes Biology and PossibleManagement Tactics for California Citrus

Diaprepes root weevil poses a serious threat to California agriculture. This weevil can complete its life cycle on a large number of plants, including most varieties of citrus. The aboveground life stages, the adults and eggs, are difficult to see because they are hidden in the foliage of plants. The larval stage spends most of its time below the soilís surface feeding on the roots of plants. This feeding activity not only removes root tissue needed by the plant but also provides openings for pathogens found in the soil. Man is extremely good at unknowingly moving this insect to new locations.

2007 Beth Grafton-Cardwell (Pest Management Infrastructure)

Pest Management Infrastructure

This Citrus Research Board funding supports three Staff Research Associates (SRA) located at the Kearney Agricultural Center and Lindcove Research and Extension Center. These SRAs direct an additional four laboratory Assistants whose salaries are funded by other grant sources.

2006 Kris Godfrey (Diaprepes Phenology and Insecticidal Control in San Diego County)

Diaprepes Phenology and
Insecticidal Control in San Diego County

Diaprepes root weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (L.) (Cole-optera: Curculionidae), is a serious threat to agricultural and nursery production in California. Research on phenology and insecticidal control began in July 2006 in San Diego County after infestations were found in Orange, Los Angeles, and San Diego Counties in late 2005 and early 2006.

2006 Beth Grafton-Cardwell (Survey of California Citrus and Other Plants for Brevipalpus Mites That Could Potentially Vector Citrus Leprosis Virus)

Survey of California Citrus and Other Plants for Brevipalpus Mites That Could Potentially Vector Citrus Leprosis Virus

Citrus leprosis disease, caused by two viruses, is present in a number of South American countries (Brazil, Argentina, and Venezuela, among others) and most Central American coun-tries and was recently found in Mexico. The disease is not yet found in the United States.

2006 Beth Grafton-Cardwell (San Joaquin Valley Insecticide Efficacy Trials for Citrus Pests)

San Joaquin Valley Insecticide Efficacy Trials for Citrus Pests

The purpose of this project is to screen new insecticides for efficacy against pests including scales, mites, katydids and ants. Information derived from this project is used to update the UCIPM Pest Management Guidelines, produce Arthropod Management Test articles and support new insecticide registrations.

2006 Beth Grafton-Cardwell (Long-term Effects of Chloronicotinyls on Citrus IPM)

Long-term Effects of Chloronicotinyls on Citrus IPM

Whether or not the glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) treat-ments of 2.0 oz Assail or 32 oz Admire help or hinder control of other pests of citrus. Secondly, we wanted to know if in-creasing the rate of Assail to 5.7 oz/acre would be of benefit in controlling those other pests. In each block, there were three 6-acre treated replicates and three 6 acre untreated replicates arranged in a checkerboard fashion in four Paramount citrus orchards in Kern County.

Evaluation of the Effects of Micromite (diflubenzuron) on Forktailed Katydids

Evaluation of the Effects of Micromite (diflubenzuron) on Forktailed Katydids

Katydids have been a serious pest of citrus ever since growers switched from using broad spectrum organophosphate and car-bamate insecticides to soft pesticides such as Success for citrus thrips and Esteem for California red scale.

Monitoring for Pesticide Resistance in California Red Scale

Monitoring for Pesticide Resistance in California Red Scale

California red scale resistance to Lorsban, Supracide, and Sevin reached a peak in the San Joaquin Valley in 1997 that multiple applications of these insecticides could not control. Since that time, growers have been relying heavily on Esteem for California red scale control.

Texas Citrus Mite and Yuma Spider Mite Studies

Texas Citrus Mite and Yuma Spider Mite Studies

Texas citrus mite and Yuma spider mite are new pests of citrus in the lower San Joaquin Valley. Texas citrus mite has been found on a wide range of citrus varieties and causes leaf drop and fruit stippling in the early fall. Yuma spider mite has only been found on mandarins and causes severe leaf and fruit stippling. Both of these pests have been long-time residents in southern citrus production areas of California but are behaving differently in the San Joaquin Valley. Our objective was to learn about these pests in the San Joaquin Valley and to develop IPM programs to control them.

Field Management Plan and Biocontrol Rearing System for Citrus Peelminer

Field Management Plan and Biocontrol Rearing System for Citrus Peelminer

Objective 1. Development of a pheromone-based monitor-ing system: Valley-wide trap deployment took place from February to November 2006 with new lures developed by Dr. Jocelyn Millar, UC Riverside. Several trials were conducted in 2006 and additional trials will be conducted in spring 2007. The trap data relative to percent fruit damage were incon-clusive this year – as they were last year – and we are contin-uing to research this problem.