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Past Research – Page 18

2006 Mikeal L. Roose (Citrus Rootstock Breeding and Evaluation)

Citrus Rootstock Breeding and Evaluation

Citrus rootstock breeding is a very long-term project aimed at providing the California citrus industry with a diversity of new rootstocks that improve productivity and profitability. New hybrid rootstocks and those imported from elsewhere are com-pared with standard rootstocks for yield, tree size, disease resistance, fruit quality, soil adaptation, compatibility with important scion varieties and other traits. Progress on the specific objectives of the 2005-2006 proposal is summarized below.

2006 Joseph L. Smilanick (New Methods to Control Postharvest Decay of Citrus)

New Methods to Control Postharvest Decay of Citrus

The purpose of this project is to evaluate new methods to extend the postharvest life of fresh citrus fruit.

2006 James F. Thompson (Survey of Sensing Methods for Detection of Freeze Damage in Oranges)

Survey of Sensing Methods for Detection of Freeze Damage in Oranges

The goal of this project is to develop and test field methods for using an ethanol sensor and magnetic resonance to measure whether a sample of oranges contains a threshold level of freeze-damaged fruit.

2006 Bret Wallach (Robotic Mechanical Harvester for Fresh Market Citrus)

Robotic Mechanical Harvester for Fresh Market Citrus

This year’s project goal was to complete the Scout’s concep-tual development: (1) Determine the ability of the scout to see and map the fruit on the trees; (2) Determine the required arm complexity; and (3) Complete the scout virtual reality simulation.

5500-190 R.F. Luck New Proposal 2010-2011

5500-190 R.F. Luck New Proposal 2010-2011

California is one of the last citrus growing regions worldwide to be invaded by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), which is one of the most significant economic pests of citrus. It makes sense to take lessons learned by others to advance California’s approach to
managing this pest. Thus developing management tools as quickly as possible to monitor the pest (e.g. finding an attractant), to detect the disease (better and faster detection methods) and to employ natural enemies to slow the psyllid’s movement into commercial citrus. This project will afford an opportunity
for researchers to achieve their objectives and results quickly and efficiently by providing a reliable source of psyllids to develop early-invasion management tools. This project will also develop a rearing program for large scale production when necessary.