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Joint ACP Biological Control Task Force Receives Prestigious CDPR IPM Achievement Award

 

     The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR), honored four organizations for their achievements in reducing risk from pesticide use in a public ceremony on February 12, 2018.

     “The variety of award winners this year demonstrates that pests—both in agricultural and urban settings—can be managed successfully using effective, low-risk methods,” said DPR Director Brian Leahy. “Integrated pest management is fundamental for managing pests thoughtfully and effectively in California.”

     The IPM Achievement Awards recognize organizations that use integrated pest management (IPM) to address the diverse pest management needs throughout California. IPM is a tool that allows people to manage pests by using natural and preventative strategies, and thus reduces the use of chemical pesticides. The awards will be given in the areas of innovation, leadership, and education and outreach.

     The Citrus Research Board Joint Agency Biological Control Task Force was one of the four honorees.

     In 2010, the Citrus Research Board (CRB) established a task force to help control an invasive insect pest called Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), a serious threat to the $3 billion California citrus industry. ACPs, which are as small as a grain of rice, can infect backyard citrus trees (and potentially commercial orchards) with a bacteria that causes a devastating plant disease called Huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening disease. There is no cure for HLB and it is fatal to trees. The CRB Joint Agency Biological Control Task Force was created and is comprised of the Citrus Research Board, California Department of Food & Agriculture, University of California-Riverside, the United States Department of Agriculture and Cal Poly-Pomona.

     Instead of relying solely on conventional pesticides to fight this insect, the task force developed a program using natural predators as a means of reducing ACP populations. The Task Force imported, reared and studied parasitic wasps from Pakistan that kill ACPs. These wasps are a key part of the first biocontrol program that successfully targeted and reduced ACP populations in urban areas and citrus orchards while replacing large-scale, pesticide-driven campaigns in sensitive urban sites. At this time, the project has been successfully implemented in several counties, including Imperial, San Diego, Riverside, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, Orange, Ventura, and Santa Barbara counties. The Task Force was honored for innovation and leadership.

The Citrus Research Board would like to congratulate the other three honorees; Hines Landscaping San Francisco, Manteca Unified School District Operations Department and Orange County Mosquito and Vector Control District and thank CDPR for this honor.

     

 

Make Plans to Attend the 39th Annual Post-Harvest Pest Control Conference!

Please join us for the 39th Annual Post-Harvest Pest Control Conference!

This highly technical two-day conference for researchers, industry personnel and service company representatives will provide updates on recent developments in post-harvest disease control.

The conference will kick-off at 8:00 am on Tuesday, April 17 and conclude at 12:30 pm on Wednesday, April 18.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER FOR THE CONFERENCE (DEADLINE: APRIL 6, 2018)

CLICK HERE TO SEE CONFERENCE SCHEDULE

CLICK HERE FOR SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

 

CRB-Sponsored Citrus Showcase Seminar Latest Available Strategies for Managing ACP in Your Orchards

CRB-Sponsored Citrus Showcase Seminar

Latest Available Strategies for Managing ACP in Your Orchards

After the CCM Citrus Showcase lunch program, stick around and hear Beth Grafton-Cardwell, Ph.D., an Integrated Pest Management Specialist with the University of California, Riverside and the Director of the Lindcove Research and Extension Center deliver a talk about the work her team has been doing studying Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) management for the past several years in southern California. Nastaran Tofangsazi, Ph.D., a post-doctoral researcher at the University of California, Riverside, has been evaluating insecticides and conducting field trials to determine the residual impact of conventional and organic insecticides. This research is supported by a Citrus Research Board (CRB) grant and a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Technical Assistance for Specialty Crops (TASC) grant. In 2017, Grafton-Cardwell was awarded USDA Multi-Agency Coordination (MAC) Group funding to hire a team of four psyllid scouts to conduct year-round monitoring of 180 commercial citrus orchards in southern California. Their biweekly sampling is ongoing in the Ventura, San Bernardino, Riverside, Temecula, San Diego, Coachella and Imperial citrus growing regions. The orchards use various psyllid management practices, including broad spectrum, soft and organic insecticide strategies. The data the psyllid scouts are collecting is providing critical information about the impact these management strategies have on the psyllid populations and assisting Task Forces and Pest Control Districts in developing effective psyllid management programs. 

An important result of this research is that the psyllid is “all about the flush,” and so the heaviest psyllid populations are occurring in areas where trees are flushing continuously, such as Ventura, Riverside and San Bernardino, and lowest in the desert areas where the flush hardens off for long periods of time. Broad-spectrum, long-residual insecticides reduce psyllid densities the most, especially during the fall when conditions are most favorable for psyllids. ACP populations often start on the edges of groves, and so border treatments could be applied when psyllids begin to develop on these edges, making subsequent whole-orchard, area-wide treatments more effective. 

With the assistance of Sandy Olkowski, Ph.D., at the CRB, the psyllid collections also are providing information for the team to develop a rapid presence-absence method of ACP monitoring, sampling strategies to determine if psyllids are on the borders and treatment thresholds that could be utilized by Pest Control Advisors to assist growers with psyllid management. During the CRB’s Showcase workshop, Grafton-Cardwell will provide an overview of the psyllid management tactics that currently are being conducted around the state and the level of psyllid control being achieved. 

She also will discuss new tactics being developed by researchers that could be added to the grower repertoire to improve existing psyllid management programs. These include the work of Mamoudou Setamou, Ph.D., Texas A&M University-Kingsville, who is working with screened fencing along the edge of orchards, which functions as a barrier to psyllid movement into the orchard. Grafton- Cardwell further will report on the project proposed by Philippe Rolshausen, Ph.D., to study the production of “Citrus Undercover Production System” (CUPS) at the Lindcove Research and Extension Center. This project will enclose citrus in screening to protect it against psyllids and determine the cost of production and the level of productivity of the trees. Additionally, Grafton- Cardwell will provide an update on the research of Mark Hoddle, Ph.D., into the efficacy of biocontrol releases of Tamarixia in residential areas. 
 

1.0 hour of “Other” Continuing Education Units have been
approved by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation.

Citrograph Spring 2018

California Citrus Showcase on pg. 8

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Citrograph Winter 2018

Tracking citrus DNA modifications

Check out the new CRB’s new board on pg. 8
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Register for 2018 UC Riverside Citrus Day for the Industry

Please join us for the 7th Annual Citrus Field Day, designed for citrus growers and citrus industry representatives. Pending approval, we will be offering 5.0 hours of California Continuing Education Credit for Pest Control Advisers (PCA).

REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED. LIMITED SPOTS AVAILABLE.

Please call the CRB Office for more information at (559) 738-0246.

 
 CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD EVENT FLYER

 
 CLICK HERE FOR THE UCR CAMPUS MAP

CRB to Host New Assessment Form Trainings

Effective October 1, 2017, deliveries to packing houses will need to use a new CRB assessment form. The form will be available on the CRB website as we are creating a new database to allow for the electronic submission of forms. The changes can be explained in three factors:

  1. Please submit organic production separately from conventionally produced citrus. We have developed two different forms: one for each type of production.
  2. Please submit your production as delivered from each of the three production districts.
  3. Please submit your production by the detail of varietal type and cultivar as afforded on the respective assessment form.

 

Please note that the data being supplied is distributed in an accumulated form to assure confidentiality for every grower.

The Citrus Research Board is conducting a series of meetings to present the assessment form changes. The meeting is geared toward packing house managers and assessment administrative staff. Please find information about meeting dates, times and locations below.

 

CLICK HERE for more information

     Please RSVP before November 3rd by emailing tsilveira@citrusresearch.org or by calling

Tiffany Silveira at 559-738-0246.

CLICK HERE to download flyer

Citrograph Fall 2017

Join Us at the California Citrus Conference
Special Post-Harvest Section (See Pages 32-50)
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